Our Fragrances

The Apothecary (leather, cedar wood)

« Ultimate homage to a man who, thanks to his talent and passion for nature and his fellow being, created a universe of fragrances relating his memories and emotions. A subtle combina- tion of the heat of the leather and the freshness of an essential oil of quality wood, this fragrance conveys the frailty and determination of a man whose only limit was that of his dreams... »

 

 

Journey to Marrakech (amber)

The apothecary wrote in his Orient travel journal about ambergris: « During my visit to the souks in Marrakech, I found a basic ingredient extracted from pure natural ambergris macerated in alcohol to age. Used for centuries and extremely rare, I combined it with musk, civet, masterwort and other aromas for my luxury preparations and to scent assortments set in silver and gold cases... »

 

 

 

My Grandmother’s wardrobe (cedar)

The apothecary wrote in his Morocco travel journal about the Atlas cedar: « High in the Atlas Mountains I found a species of cedar called ‘cedrus atlantica glauca’ which pro- duces a strong-smelling resin and which possesses an aromatic essential oil with very interesting properties: antifungal, antiseptic, wound healing and a decongestant for the airways. I created a candle using my natural wax to capture its aromas and its extremely beneficial and soothing properties...»

Sunday service (musk)

The apothecary wrote in his travel journal about Musk: « I brought back from my travels around Tonkin, this small gland called the musk pod. Its fragrance reminds me of the timber and stone churches where I would go to pray every week. After the service, the church would be filled with the scent of musk and incense which impregnated the wall hangings. I wanted to recreate this atmosphere with an oily aromatic perfume captured in my natural wax which releases its aromas as it burns... »

 

An evening at the castle (patchouli, amber, musk, cedar, pine)

The apothecary wrote in his travel journal: « It was during a visit to one of the chateaux of Normandy, once frequented by Louis-Nicolas Vauquelin, a pharmacist and a source of inspiration, that I had the pleasure to be invited to one of the famously lavish dinners thrown by the owner. As soon as I set foot through the gates to the property, I fell under the spell of its seemingly endless drive of centuries-old trees, eventually opening up onto a French-style formal garden worthy of the most sumptuous creations of Versailles and onto a 18th century chateau. Seduced by the divine mix of the luxurious fragrances of the flora as well as the dainty figures of the bourgeoisie, I attempted to convey the opulence and lightness which so completely captivated my senses and which I decided to seal for eternity in my natural wax... »

Family Christmas (cinnamon and orange)

The apothecary wrote in his Sri Lanka travel journal about the cinnamon and orange: « I brought back this brown orange peel from Sri Lanka. It resulted in these fragrances which reminded me of my childhood with the Christmas oranges and cinnamon biscuits hidden near the fireplace. I captured these notes in my plant wax to make a candle which I light to evoke my Christmases in a perfumer-apothecary’s family in order to share this moment... »

Midsummer night's dream (fig)

The apothecary wrote in his Sri Lanka travel journal about the cinnamon and orange: « I brought back this brown orange peel from Sri Lanka. It resulted in these fragrances which reminded me of my childhood with the Christmas oranges and cinnamon biscuits hidden near the fireplace. I captured these notes in my plant wax to make a candle which I light to evoke my Christmases in a perfumer-apothecary’s family in order to share this moment... »

Candlelit dinner (tuberose)

The apothecary wrote in his journal about his travels in the Mediterranean to Grasse and the tuberose: « Tuberose flowers are enchanting and their scent remains heady even two days after they have been picked. I remove the leaves to be able to capture it and thanks to my eau de vie I am able to produce a divine absolute which is so powerful that just a few drops are enough to perfume my plant waxes and invade my laboratory with their intoxicating fragrance. I am thinking of using it in my single note floral perfumes as well as in my preparations and ointments... and to send a sample to Madame de la Vallière, if Louis XIV does not take umbrage... »

The Hermitage (cashmere, sandalwood, oakmoos, clove)

The apothecary wrote in his travel journal: « The fragrance of a family house is floating in the air around the Hermitage, this so dear to my heart construction. I wanted to encapsulate all of those scents that reminded me of my childhood. After passing the door, I could find again the smell of clove that my grandparents were using to make their own orange wine. While I was climbing the stairs, I could smell sandalwood and cashmere coming from a huge oak door left half- open. The souvenirs of my grand mother’s numerous trips to Nepal. At twilight, we liked to end the day by going for a walk in the centena- rian oak trees planted path, where this intoxicating moss scent gave me the desire to capture those unforgettable instants. »

Palace of roses (old rose from Damask)

The apothecary wrote in his Orient travel journal: « It was during a stay on the Mediterranean coast, on one of my numerous visits in summer, that I visited the oriental palaces surrounded by fields of roses. My hosts took me to see them, happy to share with me their passion for rare and old-fashioned varieties. I was engulfed by these olfactory discoveries which are so dear to my heart, those of rose tea, milk baths, Turkish delight and bowlfuls of petals with each aroma flooding my senses in the heat of the afternoon. The Damask rose, favoured by my hosts, formed the basis of my work, to which I added hints of different varieties in order to obtain a fragrance which was both light and heady, reminiscent of the gentle breeze which whispered over the rose fields I passed through during this visit... »

Charlotte’s dreams (blossom tree)

The apothecary wrote in his Morocco travel journal: « After lunch on the grass, as my daughter slept under these citrus trees, I was inspired by her state of deep sleep in which I could tell she was dreaming, to create for her a perfume with relaxing fragrances, which would later become her dream...in a soothing natural wax candle... »

St. Petersburg ball (Cologne fine)

The apothecary wrote in his journal about his travels to the royal courts of Europe: « Eau de Cologne is a category of perfume containing 4 to 6% essential oils. Giovanni Maria Farina, an Italian perfume maker, established himself in Cologne at the beginning of the 18th century where he produced, from 1708, what he referred to as “admirable water”. Farina’s perfume was created with the help of a mix of essential oils and almost pure alcohol. The admirable water gradually conquered Europe’s royal courts and the St Petersburg ball... »